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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 1,735 (some duplicates have been removed)
CSPAN
Dec 28, 2012 6:00am EST
obvious. do you think this rule of law has been given on day one and suddenly it was followed? of course not. do not think democracy will solve them. it is both your friend and your enemies. hamilton and madison right the document. it is a very good document. ask any of us on the courts, we would be in agreement on the basic things. the basic framework is it creates institutions of democracy. people can decide for themselves what kinds of community they want it is a special kind of democracy. it is a democracy that protect certain basic human rights that assures some degree of equality. the separation of powers is not what you are looking for here. separation of powers -- he is very clear. you are looking for judicial independence. the separation of powers is both vertical and it is also horizontal. the basic function is not to preserve a rule of law. it is to divide power into pockets. you prevent any group of people from being too powerful. that is the basic purpose. finally, a rule of law. you have a document that is trying to restore democratic institutions, protection of huma
CSPAN
Dec 27, 2012 6:00am EST
where he teaches constitutional law at the college and the law school. he received both his b.a. and j.d. from yale and serves as an editor for the yale law's journal. after clerking for stephen breyer when he was judge of the u.s. court of appeals for the first circuit professor amar joined the faculty of yale in 1985. professor amar is a coeditor of the leading constitutional law casebook, decision-decision- making and is the author of several other books including the constitution and criminal procedure, the bill of rights creation and reconstruction, america's constitution a biography and most recently america's unwritten constitution, the president's and decibels we live by. the honorable clarence thomas has served as an associate justice of the supreme court of the united states for nearly 21 years. he attended conceptual cemetery and received an a.b. from the college of the holy cross and his j.d. from yale law school. he served as an assistant attorney general of missouri from 1974 to 1977, an attorney with the monsanto company from 77 to 79 and legislative assistant to senat
CSPAN
Dec 27, 2012 12:00pm EST
complete contravention of the fourth amendment and complete contravention of the law at that time. as i'm sure and many of my colleagues will certainly recall this was revealed to the american public four years later when it was reported in "the new york times" in 2005. and in response after years of back and forth contentious debate, congress passed the fisa amendments act, the bill that we are considering on this floor today. we're considering a reauthorization. this law gave the government new surveillance authorities, but it also included a sunset provision to ensure that congress examines where the law is working and the way it was intended. now, the debate we're having right now on this floor is that reexamination. i will just note that i think it's unfortunate that we're doing this at the last second. we have known that this intelligence law is going to expire for years. it was laid out for a multiyear span. and certainly, it is irresponsible for this chamber to be debating this bill under a falsely created pressure that it needs to be done without any amendments in order t
CSPAN
Dec 26, 2012 8:00pm EST
has joined yale university where he teaches constitutional law at the college and the law school. he received both his b.a. and j.d. from yale and serves as an editor for the yale law's journal. after clerking for stephen breyer when he was judge of the u.s. court of appeals for the first circuit professor amar joined the faculty of yale in 1985. professor amar is a coeditor of the leading constitutional law casebook, decision-decision- making and is th author of several other books including the constitution and criminal procedure, the bill of rights creation and reconstruction, america's constitution a biography and most recently america's unwritten constitution, the president's and decibels we live by. the honorable clarence thomas has served as an associate justice of the supreme court of the united states for nearly 21 years. he attended conceptual cemetery and received an a.b. from the college of the holy cross and his j.d. from yale law school. he served as an assistant attorney general of missouri from 1974 to 1977, an attorney with the monsanto company from 77 to 79 and
PBS
Dec 26, 2012 10:00pm PST
connecticut massacre still raw, spencer michels looks at a california law that aims to head off such violence. >> reporter: though no one knows the diagnosis of the perpetrator of the shootings in newtown, the killings have raised once again the issue of forcing the mentally ill into treatment. >> warner: as congress comes back to washington to resume fiscal cliff negotiations, we ask, what happens if they don't reach a deal? >> ifill: we talk with a repsentative of egypt's muslim brotherhood about the new brotherhood-backed constitution signed into law today. >> warner: and we have another of our conversations with retiring members of congress. paul solman sat down with the always outspoken massachusetts democrat barney frank. >> the notion that people would not go along with an important public policy because i hurt their feelings, i don't think that's true. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by
PBS
Dec 26, 2012 6:00pm PST
brotherhood about the new brotherhood-backed constitution signed into law today. >> warner: and we have another of our conversations with retiring members of congress. paul solman sat down with the always outspoken massachusetts democrat barney frank. >> the notion that people would not go along with an important public policy because i hurt their feelings, i don't think that's true. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: a major winter storm surged into the midwest and northeast, fouling flight schedules and ruining road conditions on this day after christmas. the huge weather system left a trail of destruction in the gulf coast region and at least six people dead. >> oh, wow, oh jesus, look at that tornado. >> ifill: the calm of christmas night was shattered by tornadoes dropp
CSPAN
Dec 27, 2012 9:00am EST
law at tuesday among college officials. papers over the prop of why so many latinos and blacks are academically competitive, and it gives states and schools involved in unsavory activities -- like decides which racial minorities will be heard and which ones not -- and how much blood is needed to establish group membership. and i didn't want even mention mismatch. -- i didn't even mention mismatch. [laughter] the mismatch book, in addition to o giving chapter or and verse and ample, irrefutable documentation for why this is a real problem also touches on some of these other problems that i've listed too. you add all those up, okay, and it seems to me that it's a lot stronger than the educational benefits from these random interracial conversations we might be having more of if we use racial preferences in admissions. okay. well, let me wrap up with one sort of happy note, but then one not so happy note. it seems to me -- and i think it ought to seem to the justices -- that one reason why we ought to end this nonsenses now is because of the changing face of america, right? 40 or 50 y
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 5:00pm EST
role of law. i said to him at the time, what strikes me about this topic was that other than the occasion i can think of, other than when paul worked at the state department and bill clinton was president, this topic in my view has never gotten the attention it deserves. it has been treated too much as a technical topic. not as a fundamental topic about the relations of the state's. in my experience, i always say the chinese leadership, the most distinctive characteristic is they are systematically opened. that is to say the modus operandi is on a particular topic, let's look for the best ideas throughout the world, bring them back, study them, and then customize them as appropriate for our own system. and yet in this one respect, they have been a little bit slow. we had this conversation 10 years ago. now, i will stick my neck out and say for a variety of reasons, some of which are circumstantial, some of which have to do with the leadership in the standing committee come i believe that this topic will have to become an a more important topic. and that will be treated as all thi
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 12:00am EST
law right in england that allowed people to have firearms for self-defense and other purposes, and that right common law right, traveled across the ocean with the colonists and they needed the guns here, whereas in england mostly they didn't. and so people soon came to have an enormous facility and knowledge of firearms, and of course, as we all know, it produced the result of victory against the most powerful military country in the world at the time in the revolutionary war. >> host: i want to talk about that. and again, think people get hazy views on history, and it comes from movies or tv. when we had the revolutionary period, what was the role of guns? in this militias. >> guest: well, george washington didn't think a whole lot of the militia. he grossed about it at times but also made remarks that allowed as how the militia was a useful thing to have. he couldn't have bit the continental army without the existence of the militias and people who had been in the militias, and more importantly, volunteers and others who knew how to use firearms, and that was key. >> host: people
SFGTV2
Dec 26, 2012 3:00am PST
holly has come up with a really wonderful solution within law enforcement that we would love you to talk about and it's preventive and solution. >> thank you. it's not going to be a shock to you that i don't have a sizzle reel but i did manage to get a few powerpoint slides in so it's a good thing if i can get my next one. can you advance it for me please? so it is a safety course that i created with yahoo. we partnered together. i started asking questions the first day so my boots are on the ground and i'm in the schools and i love doing what i do, and i believe wholeheartedly and i believe it was the soft power -- yes, i love it. i think it's effective in so many ways, so i had luckily teamed up with the right people at yahoo who were really amazing and just the foresight they saw, and believed in the concept that law enforcement needs to be a piece of this puzzle and have some solutions. we have a unique part in the schools and with kids and this did get certified for the peace officer standards and we get credit for that being police officers and our training and our curriculum
SFGTV
Dec 28, 2012 1:00am PST
opening up in the city, so there is sort of a very, kind of, unique law and relationship around these convenience zones. the crv redempt zones and how they are created and how the state law require that they are managed and facilitated and what this means to small business. so i want to put forward some proactive policy recommendations so that we're being ahead of the curve and not waiting until this may become an issue down the road for small businesses. so i just wanted to just make that clear. this is a policy discussion for you to take a look at, make recommendations. the commission can take action tonight, if it's comfortable or wait until the next commission meeting or two commission meetings. it's at your discretion to make sure that you are comfortable with the policy that is flushed out to be put forward to our policymakers in the city. so i just wanted to make sure that you understood that it's agendized as an action item tonight, but we do that as pro forma, as part of agendizing anything that the commission may be taking action on in case you want to take action tonight, b
SFGTV2
Dec 25, 2012 1:30am PST
difficult ability to say, did you actually choose that and did you choose it in a way that the law would recognize. so the law all of the time develops concepts that scientists are interested in studying. it might be competency, for example. well, competency is really a multifaceted construct from a legal perspective. it could be competency to be executed, it could be competency to commit a crime. it could be competency to contribute to the decision as to whether voluntarily commit yourself to a mental hospital. it could be competency to participate in an abortion decision. so competency means many different things. the first thing you have to do as a scientist is ask the question, well, what does the law mean by it because if you want me to measure it, i have to somehow apply it. so going back to the question of free will, because a scientist can't operationally define it, they can't measure it, they're not really that much use to legal debates about free will. now, what does it mean on the legal side? i actually think the idea of free will or what is often referred to as volitional con
FOX
Jan 1, 2013 5:30pm EST
night at ten.reporting rreder - fox 45 news at 5:30. - several nnw laws taking effect . today.anotter measure protects children roo identity theft .... by allowing parents to any time.eer child's credit at - time.veterans will now be ble have their veteran status shown on heir drrver's liiensee license.and another measure bans arsenic in chicken feed to helppkeep toxins ut of the chesapeake bay. 3 the fate of he fiscal cliff is now in the haads of the house. . . leaders roo √°both√° parties went behind closed doors with their respective caucuses thii afternoon.... discussing the deal approvee by the senate in the wee hours of tis morniig. under terms of the senate- approved legislation: taxxs on &pthe middle ccassswill not go more, and households earning 450-thouuand dollars or more will see their taxes reeurn tt clinton-era levvls. hhuse opponents say it was dooe in - hasse. penntor mitch mcconnell observed quote "this shouldn't be the model for how we do things arouud here" end quote, piie a bull in a china closett - anyway 3 if the bill isspassed in the house, the president is coul
SFGTV2
Dec 25, 2012 2:00am PST
automoton, usually you can. the law has a bright line. it says if you engage in a wongful action, there is a defense called the insanity defense which never works as most of us know because we don't recognize it. should we recognize it, that's an interesting question. should we have a more robust concept of diminished responsibility in light of the understanding that some people have less control over their preferences and desires or should we have better sentencing schemes or get rid of incarceration and come up with different models of trying to deal with punishment once we understand people have wrong selections. i think those are all interesting questions, but is there free will? well, the fact that almost everybody in the audience raised either their right or left hand contemplated it and were quickly able to act and respond. that to me says, yes, there is. now what do we want to do about it? now that we understand that those of us in the audience or up here that like chocolate cake may not have control over it, how do we want to account for that if at all in the criminal ju
CSPAN
Dec 26, 2012 9:00am EST
the university of colorado law school. she talked about gender discrimination cases and her own experiences as a woman law school graduate in the early 1960s. this conversation is about an hour, 15 minutes. .. >> we are so grateful to have you here, phil, for all your work. [applause] >> we have several regions here, two of whom are grads of our fine law school, michael and jodi your and irene is here also i believe. and any other regions are here, we thank you for all your support and your spirit. we do very much believe in engaging with the community come and we want to continue to do so in so many ways. i would echo what melissa hart said, and very importantly acknowledge the leadership in terms of the energy she brought to the white center, this lecture was her brainchild. the constitution of the activities were brainchild, and recognizing that under the board of regents, the chase award given from the president's office given to melissa hard for her work in community service. so i want to acknowledge mullah so hard. [applause] -- melissa hart. >> and finally, all of you mak
SFGTV2
Dec 26, 2012 10:00am PST
english and chinese. we have a quick summary of the laws. the ada, calif. building code, the civil rights, and our experts here will elaborate. we also have a list of certified caps at work in san francisco for you. carla johnson with the mayor's office of disability has created a really good it died of out to interview your experts to make sure you are getting the best quality product for you. been next -- the money you pay for the inspection you can take as a tax deduction. any money that if you have taken can be applied as a tax deduction. this can be done on an annual basis. next, the opportunity, and a fund -- opportunity loan fund, providing for small businesses to pay for the inspection or to make improvements needed. to do it before you receive the lawsuit. and lastly, we of the bar association and their resources. they're providing their legal service for you. this last thing i am going to share with you in terms of what we have seen in our office is that with the individuals, that does not necessarily mean an individual will follow up with a lawsuit. what we've seen in our offic
SFGTV2
Dec 27, 2012 12:30am PST
partnership in south florida with local law enforcement who had gone into schools talking about bullying, including cyber bullying and giving people concrete examples of things of situations they saw, it was remarkable. and that is why we will continue to do that work. so i hope today as we move forward you will understand that we are in this together with you at the department of justice. this is an all hands on deck enterprise. there is so much to do. i hope at the end of this day we will indeed all follow the lead of that student, walk out and say what are one or two things i'm going to do differently and better? how are we going to improve this situation? i hope if you take one and only one thing from melinda and my and ruslyn's remarks today, if you have an idea, please bring them to us. we want to learn from you. we are in this together and i want to say thank you because the most important thing we have is a recognition that you understand that this is indeed a national issue for us to deal with. i'm looking forward to the rest of the day, i appreciate your presence and i
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 1:00pm EST
supervisor and refer to a worker who as a nigger or black people as niggers may be in violation ofhe law creating a hostile workplac and thereby making yourself t subject to liability under thetl 1964e call or under the civil-rights law of 1964. so, under certain circumstancess you can would make yourself -- which subjects yourself to legal liability, or another way. if you commit violence and in the indication of a -- the commission of a violent act refer to people using the n-word, you might be subject to hate law legislation, and thereby not only be prosecuted for assault or whatever violent act you have committed, but you might subject yourself to an enhanced penalty by running afoul of state hate laws. so, under certain circumstances, yeah, you would be in violation of the law. generally speaking, though, because of the strong shielding power of the first amendment, people, for instance, comedians or writers, can use the n-word and not have to fear the law, though you might have to fear a public opinion which itself can be a very powerful force. >> host: is that the near word versus
SFGTV2
Dec 26, 2012 2:00am PST
to develop a black letter law if you have all these factors and bullying and you fell outside and that works okay in the courtroom. right? as prosecutors we need clear understanding of the laws to understand whether we have a criminal violation or not, but i am fearful we maybe overly legalistic and the way we deal with on a daily basis and we need to approach this by a global perspective respecting people and understanding we have the same rights and obligations and starting with the adults and i go back to the adults because the adults really have to tow the line here. they really have to walk the talk. i cannot tell you how often i of involved in large mentoring efforts and now in two different places, in l.a. and arizona. i cannot tell you how often the teachers are the ones that set the tone whether we have a respectable environment or and not part of that is education and we have to educate the adults that spend time with the kids and the federal government will come up with the giens and 37 factors or 40 and frankly most of us won't remember and unless we're prosecuting and
SFGTV2
Dec 27, 2012 5:00am PST
? and i think perhaps the law enforcement folks feel the cultures in the communities and see that come out in the adults. i would like to hear about how do you affect a culture and even in san francisco we have many cultures affecting what is valued, what is criticized. >> you know i think that richard touched upon this. it's a relationship of power and it's clearly going to differ from community to community; right. when i was telling you i was picked because because i didn't speak english or at all initially there were only about 5% of us that were hispanic in the school and wouldn't be the case if 95% are hispanic and english speaking as a second language, but i think the way that we can deal with the issue is we ought to first of all start with the notion of respect for others, and respect for others can work across the line. it doesn't necessarily mean -- it doesn'tly has to deal with the culture. is how we treat one another? and i think we have to be very clear in our educational process and the communication to our people and what is acceptable behavior and what is unacceptable
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 6:45am EST
. >> you're a law professor correct? so the courtroom drama part, did that come easy to? >> i don't know, for me no novel is really easy to write but it is true, this would fit into some of my interests as a scholar. i write about presidential power. i write about war. i've written a lot about lincoln over the years, and so taking that come those ideas, put them into fiction but if you think about it, lincoln did do things during the civil war that raise interesting questions. lincoln did suspend habeas corpus. in some cases subject to the military court-martial. my notion was what if a different process used for political reasons, nevertheless got us into the war as a way of trying to get them out of the way. >> how much political pressure was abraham lincoln under in early 1865? >> lincoln was the most talented politician i believe whoever inhabited the -- not the oval office. there was a one, but the presidential office at the time. he had to balance these competing factions of his own party. he had to run the civil war while trying to maintain his own presidency. all through the pres
SFGTV
Dec 24, 2012 6:30am PST
domestic violence investigation; there was a time when law enforcement only focused on investigation. chief suhr recognize importance of having advocacy groups located directly in the special victims unit. family can meet with investigators and have access to services in the system as they move forward. with the efforts of kathy black and -- svu has a children's room available which offers a safe environment for children exposed to family violence. child abuse is one of the toughest crimes for investigators. children are among the most vulnerable victims. thankfully there are those like kathy baxter who are constantly fighting for the prevention of child abuse. i believe partnership with outside agencies have allowed us to find justice during this complex investigation. another important component of svu is the -- unit. those members solely on internet crimes against children. the cases are complex and require persistent and dedication to identify and locate perpetrators who possess and distribute child pornography. we are only one of many law enforcement agencies across the region w
FOX
Jan 1, 2013 6:00am PST
of new laws and they just took a affect today. and we will tell you about one that affects you if you use facebook. >> reporter: well there are a total of 876 new laws in the books in our state and one is designed to protect homeowners trying to avoid foreclosure. this new law would prevent banks from starting the foreclosure basis and it will protect people going through alone modification. and you can still go ahead with the for close to our some time. it is now illegal to use facebook user i.d. and password to keep their jobs. colleges and user add mixes are also prohibited in doing the same thing and can no longer ask the students. driver less cars, pay paves the way and they are a bay area technical giant and as long as there is a real person watching nearby incase of an emergency. with more than 800 new laws, we can't go through all of them but these are just a few we have picked out but coming up in about 45 minutes we will tell you about a new law that has to do with carrying rifles in public. allie rasmus, ktvu channel 2 morning news. >>> thank you, alley. they are prepar
SFGTV2
Dec 26, 2012 10:00pm PST
for other laws and market based changes that could have a big domino effect on our exposures, especially to endocrine disrupting compounds, you go back to standard you may have used in college, i did when i didn't have any money was to soak the beans, it's way cheaper, avoids canned food exposure, also to go with frozen or fresh vegetables if you can rather than cans, to choose stainless steel water bottles and other alternatives for baby bottles if you have young children and to change markets and to change laws because we know there are a lot of inequities that shapes who has access to healthy foods and fresh fruits,, we need to change some laws that these canned foods are safer, and more foods are available. we've gone into a can of corn, i don't know if you got that, we dove into this can of corn to talk about the bpa act, from representative ann marky from the house and senator from the senate, and this bans [inaudible] food and beverage containers, from infant and toddlers food, from everything, from adults, pregnant women, some important populations in there and requir
SFGTV2
Dec 23, 2012 11:00pm PST
the picture. it reminded me of a priceless letter he sent to me in law school when he was over there in the peace corps. chris wrote wonderful notes and told me when he went running in the village where he was staying, only to have locals come up beside him and say where is it, where did it go. where is what? your donkey. i don't have a donkey. >> why are you running? [ laughter] >> for exercise. >> exercise? are you nuts? if you want exercise, come work on my orchard, you crazy american. >> chris succeeded because he knew how to laugh at himself and relate to people around him. there are two more memories i want to share. one deals with government and jazz. chris always wanted to work for the state department. he always wanted to be involved in the foreign service. he took the foreign service exam when we were undergrads at cal. he came back the first time, pleased with results on the written but felt he didn't do so well on the orals. the question that seemed to trip him up and left him perplexed was the following. mr. stevens, please compare american government and jazz musi
SFGTV2
Dec 30, 2012 12:30pm PST
koz meats and cans, not cancer, they target the makers of products who are more agile than laws, it can take decades to pass a good law, we saw those in changes of health care, what year were we starting to talk about revising our health care policies, i think it was 93 and it was 2008 before there was passage of a law so it can take decades and dozens of years, but if we ask for safer products, the market can turn on a dime. in 2007-2008, everyone started talking about bpa in plastics, by 2009, bpa-free plastics were everywhere, so can, not cancer is getting bpa out of food cans and they chased a huge success this year when campbell's soup said we're going to take the bpa out, we're waiting for a timeline from them and waiting for them to replace bpa with something safer, taking that first step was huge, even more significant perhaps is the campaign for safe cosmetics which has been around for about 10 years saying that -- getting johnson & jn -- johnson saying we're going to get carcinogens first out of our baby products across the whole world and that's really significant because
CSPAN
Dec 31, 2012 10:00am EST
. this reinforced a second exceptional pillar, common law, which posits that god-given, or the laws given from god to the people and it bubbles up word to the rumors. it gives us the government of the people, by the people and for the people that lincoln referred to. common-law stand in stark opposition to almost every other nation on earth that has developed some form of civil law come in which law trickles down from the top. both germany and england had common-law for a while, but by the 20th century both have more or less abandoned it. germany more so than england. therefore, by the end of world war ii, when you have unloaded however unwillingly its colonies, those colonies were themselves designed on principles of civil law. us, the first two pillars taken together mean that a christian, protestant religion influenced and shaped everything about american foundation of laws and defined its system of personnel rights. it wasn't just that the united states was a democratic republic, but that the very premises of what a democratic republic meant were likely to be far different in the unit
FOX Business
Dec 30, 2012 8:30am EST
the esident's health care law. a new tax on invesent income, a tax on medical device makers costing jobs, those aren't the only ones, that last tax forcing companies, many companies to yoff workers. and coming attractions for thehe new year, to ben stein, charles payne, todd schoenberger and sarah, charles, you first. >> let the flood gates open. listen, dagen, obviously, we know-- actually we don't know, but it's to nancy pelosi's point we're going to find out and i hope we like it. lot of taxes associated with obamacare. you mentioned the medic device issue, a lot of these companies, by the way, medical device companies have been laying off workers right now. and that is, if this impacts, by the way, everyone, takes away from research and development, which will take away from life saving innovation and it's just, again, the very tip of the iceberg. ultimately, there's going to be a whole lot of taxes that just opens the gate for. this is just the beginning. >> ben, even if u look at action taken by the medical device makers, there's already damage that's been done by the tax incr
SFGTV2
Dec 25, 2012 10:30pm PST
decided that we would call it seth's law in honor of her, she had been in and around sacramento for a long time. so the legislation in and of itself, i don't think it's going to work miracles, but it is definitely on people's radar now and i think you hear it in the media more and more. the reason we have a suicide barrier and the reason we are having legislation like this is because of the parents and the families because they are the ones that hurt the most and i would imagine part of the therapeutic thing, you've got to tell this story and telling it in the right place and the right time can be very effective. so seth's law does require that if you witness an act of bullying, that you must report it. >> is that for anybody? >> anyone, but particularly teachers. there is a -- sometimes we see things that aren't very pleasant and if you've ever taken it to muni, you know what i mean. your tendency is to turn away. i heard the word faggot on the play ground when i taught. the teachers were intimidated, they didn't want to be seen to have any empathy because that might reflect on them.
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 10:45pm EST
important it is to know. [applause] >> next from the georgetown university law center in washington, d.c., a discussion on the supreme court. it's about one hour and ten minutes. >> hello, everyone. i want to welcome you to today's program, which features an all-star lineup of authors who will be discussing their most recent books on the supreme court. i am a professor here at georgetown and executive director of the supreme court institute. it's a real privilege for the supreme court institute to host this event and i would like to thank our deputy director for putting it all together. before i turn the program over to our moderator i would like to remind everyone that after the program we have a reception following in which he will get a chance to have all of your newly purchased books signed by the authors and have a word or two with the authors hopefully coming in as you can see, we have food and beverage, so please stick around after the program. with that, i would like to introduce our moderator for today's program. tony really needs no introduction at all sali will keep it sh
NBC
Dec 30, 2012 7:00am PST
him, he's the law. say he's smart as a whip. you ought to set him on the opal gang. which reminds me, thanks for sending that telegram, if mark opal does come this way he'll get a mighty warm welcome. i'm going out now to see if i can pick up the trail. i'll keep in touch with ya. see that she keeps out of trouble if you can. oh. sure thing rogers. sorry to trouble you ms. dale, let me help you back in. thank you, sheriff. carrying any concealed weapons mr. kirby? i don't happen to have one with me this trip, but you can search me if you want to. say is there any place around here where a fellow can have a little fun? well, let's see, there is a snake bite saloon a couple miles out of town. but if you take my advice you'll stay out of there. it's the toughest place this side of glory. this is mark opal? sure. you got your camera with you? it's right outside in my truck. any man that can outsmart mark opal deserves to be rewarded. boys take this gentlemen over to the stable and buy him all the sasperella he can drink. well thanks a lot. you know if somebody were
SFGTV2
Dec 26, 2012 10:30pm PST
then we have to see these changes with the laws so if fda has proposals out for medical imaging around kids so you know how to downsize a radiation dose for kids who is smaller, their physical size is narrower, and also to make machines more accountable and more clear in how they work. >> [inaudible]. >> it's very low doses but that's an excellent question and i thought somebody would probably ask that. so, the united states preventative services task force in 2009 came out with a proposal to revise guidelines saying that perhaps women aged 40 to 50, there's no cost benefit really for that age group in terms of having mammogram of average risk, so recommended that women start mammography at age ao where the benefits really out weigh the risk, you don't have 40 years left in your life span at that point perhaps, you have 30, you're at a less vulnerable stage of life so there are a lot more benefits for life, your breast cancer risks are higher, so you know, the age 40 to 50, there's still a lot of debate about that and women need to discuss this with their own health care providers, but
SFGTV2
Dec 26, 2012 6:00pm PST
violence. the afternoon's panel will have a debate about a proposed law that would reduce felony drug possession crimes to a misdemeanor. this is what 13 states have done. we not only bring these issues to the forefront, but have the opportunity to participate -- and we have cards that you could fill out and questions. this promises to be a year of reform and change like we have never seen, and we now see prisoner reentry programs being implemented. we're still spending too much money and resources and not enough on rehabilitation and reentry. this november, the voters will decide on limiting the three strikes law. issues and measures long overdue. it is clear there is much more that needs to be done. according to a study that was published this month -- since 1989, 2000 people have been wrongfully incarcerated and they served collectively, 10,000 years. an average of 11 years person. i would like to thank the people who made this summit possible. memoranda -- amy devon -- many volunteers and all of our speakers and panelists. i would like to thank the co- sponsors, and the bar associ
SFGTV
Dec 25, 2012 9:00am PST
wanted to make more globally. the problem is the state law definition of "candidate." we can add this section in local law, which is fine and whatever version ends up tonight or thereafter will work for the moment. but i think we should urge the state legislature to include an appointed office-holder, because that was the route of this to begin with. >> that we definitely can't do tonight? >> no, it's not on the calendar, but something that we could contemplate in future and i would suspect there is support for that. >> do you have other comments about what we can do here and now? >> sorry. thank you for bringing me back. i agree that the language in lines 19 and 20 are somewhat problematic. i don't know that they work into line 16-18. i think they really only apply in subsection b. i mean it's difficult to read 16-18 and imports 19 and 20 in, that the "order to support" language. it just gets a little circular, but i do agree that support should include actions or statements whether public or non-public. that are trying to urge or encourage a particular outcome. i think that is
FOX Business
Dec 30, 2012 9:30am EST
over the dairy cliff . congress must have a frm bill by the end of the year. anan old law would kick in to force the government to b milk at another price. how painl will it get for us in the grocery store? >> it tells us how insane. the sound of the cows tell you what will happen. this is based on marketing act. it is a consequence . we have a bureaucracy that is based on this . the federal government an act in 1942. the supreme court in wich a guy growing grain on his own farm can feed himself and his own cattle was told by the supreme court he could not do this because it is it in viation . act it is it about milk and 1949 and the federal government isng to go and make a mark and make a fair market of this . we'll buy it at eight dollars a gallon. >> and it is johnathon. that milk your drinking is about to do you believedouble in price. >> forge the cookies. >> thas the problem and the farm bill is the problem. governme should center zero role in milk agriculture production. it is it so long last that intervention is the problem and creates the cliff because of the distortions and
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